Masonic Traveler

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Freemasonry, The Religion of Not Being a Religion

masonictraveler:

Freemasonry, The Religion of Not Being a Religion

is freemasonry a religionThe following comes from a piece I wrote in 2007 on the Masonic Traveler blog. It addressed, at that time, question of Freemasonry being a religion. While the ideas may have evolved some over the years, the message in it seems to still bear some resonance in light of the question rearing its head once again.

Is Freemasonry a Religion?

What perplexes me is why does it matter? Why does answering…

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I find that it is that adogmatic stance is what brings it inline with a Hermetic religion (philosophy), as in all religions - one religion.

Freemasonry, The Religion of Not Being a Religion

Freemasonry, The Religion of Not Being a Religion

is freemasonry a religionThe following comes from a piece I wrote in 2007 on the Masonic Traveler blog. It addressed, at that time, question of Freemasonry being a religion. While the ideas may have evolved some over the years, the message in it seems to still bear some resonance in light of the question rearing its head once again.

Is Freemasonry a Religion?

What perplexes me is why does it matter? Why does answering…

View On WordPress

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two

Episode 1 “Come Together”

Uruk was one of the most important cities (at one time the mot important city) in ancient Mesopotamia.

Uruk is considered the first true city in the world, the origin of writing, the first example of architectural work in stone and the building of great stone structures, the origin of the ziggurat, and the first city to develop the cylinder seal which the ancient Mesopotamians used to designate personal property or as a signature on documents. Considering the importance the cylinder seal had for the people of the time, and that it stood for one’s personal identity and reputation, Uruk could also be credited as the city which first recognized the importance of the individual in the collective community.

Starting just under 6.000 years ago, the archaeological record of Uruk reveals a period of intensive building and rebuilding, which went on for four or five centuries. In that period, a dozen or more large public buildings were built; temples, palaces, assembly halls. They used novel building techniques, like -colored stone- cone mosaics (pictures 3-4-5).

PART II

Uruk, Iraq

(via 1-plus-1-equals-one)

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